Do you know what Simon hates?

alliterativeaurantia:

simonalkenmayer:

sister-forget-me-not:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

Watching programs in which an “expert” says anything beginning with “Well, this is like medieval times, when supposed … roamed the countryside offering …”

Out! You are not an expert. Silence!

The medieval and the Middle Ages were not the same. And the Middle Ages were not the same as the Renaissance. I know it’s all Old™ to you lot, but they were in fact very different periods of time. People who say things like that probably can’t even quantify what dates were “medieval” versus “Middle Ages”

One day I will kill anyone who says things like that on television!

Medieval is what, 800 to 1100, Middle Ages 1100-1350, Renaissance 1350-1550?

*huffs* to hear Wikipedia tell it it’s all the bloody same! Yes, you’re approximately correct.

I don’t much care for labels, but to my mind, the medieval was that time immediately following the fall of Rome and the rise of Gail. The Middle Ages encapsulated the crusades, and the Renaissance was a lovely time, except for all the plague.

I simply don’t want to listen to a psychologist who is profiling criminals to bring up “those supposed doctors in the medieval times who bled people”

Sir…bleeding was a common practice well into the 19th century. And Medieval Times is a restarting franchise.

Heck James Herriot talks about it in one of his memoirs, they used it for race horses up until the 50s it looks like.

It actually has a purpose, or at least an unanticipated side effect.

In certain age groups it lowers he concentrations of harmful hormones like to start strong, that could cause cancer if in properly balanced. It also has the additional side effect of stimulating more red and white blood cell production. Which is likely how it became a cure in the first place. Some poor sap decided to bleed out the demons, and noticed that the body recovered, likely because the person’s genetics allowed for a boost in T cell production.

Wait.

Wait.

Wait.

So…

Am I healthier for nearly bleeding to death twice this year?

No Karen. That is excessive, not therapeutic.

For example, sun exposure causes the skin to produce vital amounts of vitamin D. Over exposure to sunlight causes disruption of the skin cells lead to melanoma.

So, more of a “donating blood may actually make you healthier, depending on certain factiors” thing? Or would that still be a bit much to lose at once?

That is precisely what studies have shown. Particularly for post menopausal women. It reduces the amount of testosterone in the blood stream, which lowers cancer risks. It is also an excellent way of adjusting one’s self to high altitudes in advance of travel.  know I read a study a year or so ago about the benefits to men, something about stimulating the immune system. I can’t recall.

Do you know what Simon hates?

sister-forget-me-not:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

Watching programs in which an “expert” says anything beginning with “Well, this is like medieval times, when supposed … roamed the countryside offering …”

Out! You are not an expert. Silence!

The medieval and the Middle Ages were not the same. And the Middle Ages were not the same as the Renaissance. I know it’s all Old™ to you lot, but they were in fact very different periods of time. People who say things like that probably can’t even quantify what dates were “medieval” versus “Middle Ages”

One day I will kill anyone who says things like that on television!

Medieval is what, 800 to 1100, Middle Ages 1100-1350, Renaissance 1350-1550?

*huffs* to hear Wikipedia tell it it’s all the bloody same! Yes, you’re approximately correct.

I don’t much care for labels, but to my mind, the medieval was that time immediately following the fall of Rome and the rise of Gail. The Middle Ages encapsulated the crusades, and the Renaissance was a lovely time, except for all the plague.

I simply don’t want to listen to a psychologist who is profiling criminals to bring up “those supposed doctors in the medieval times who bled people”

Sir…bleeding was a common practice well into the 19th century. And Medieval Times is a restarting franchise.

Heck James Herriot talks about it in one of his memoirs, they used it for race horses up until the 50s it looks like.

It actually has a purpose, or at least an unanticipated side effect.

In certain age groups it lowers he concentrations of harmful hormones like to start strong, that could cause cancer if in properly balanced. It also has the additional side effect of stimulating more red and white blood cell production. Which is likely how it became a cure in the first place. Some poor sap decided to bleed out the demons, and noticed that the body recovered, likely because the person’s genetics allowed for a boost in T cell production.

Wait.

Wait.

Wait.

So…

Am I healthier for nearly bleeding to death twice this year?

No Karen. That is excessive, not therapeutic.

For example, sun exposure causes the skin to produce vital amounts of vitamin D. Over exposure to sunlight causes disruption of the skin cells lead to melanoma.

Do you know what Simon hates?

simonalkenmayer:

to-many-fandoms0105:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

Watching programs in which an “expert” says anything beginning with “Well, this is like medieval times, when supposed … roamed the countryside offering …”

Out! You are not an expert. Silence!

The medieval and the Middle Ages were not the same. And the Middle Ages were not the same as the Renaissance. I know it’s all Old™ to you lot, but they were in fact very different periods of time. People who say things like that probably can’t even quantify what dates were “medieval” versus “Middle Ages”

One day I will kill anyone who says things like that on television!

Medieval is what, 800 to 1100, Middle Ages 1100-1350, Renaissance 1350-1550?

*huffs* to hear Wikipedia tell it it’s all the bloody same! Yes, you’re approximately correct.

I don’t much care for labels, but to my mind, the medieval was that time immediately following the fall of Rome and the rise of Gail. The Middle Ages encapsulated the crusades, and the Renaissance was a lovely time, except for all the plague.

I simply don’t want to listen to a psychologist who is profiling criminals to bring up “those supposed doctors in the medieval times who bled people”

Sir…bleeding was a common practice well into the 19th century. And Medieval Times is a restarting franchise.

Also Medieval Times is a perfectly lovely place to get tanked on your birthday and watch attractive fellows smack the tar out of each other. Plus! The horses! (Which I know you don’t like I’m sorry)

Pirates Dinner Adventure though? Oooooh man

We didn’t eat giant turkey legs. WE DIDN’T HAVE TURKEYS.

Mine served chicken, or “baby dragon”

Do I need to tell you we didn’t eat dragons either?

Seeing all that nonsense feels approximately like what I imagine the Egyptians feel when someone at the Halloween party dresses like a pharaoh and dresses their date as an alien

Do you know what Simon hates?

to-many-fandoms0105:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

Watching programs in which an “expert” says anything beginning with “Well, this is like medieval times, when supposed … roamed the countryside offering …”

Out! You are not an expert. Silence!

The medieval and the Middle Ages were not the same. And the Middle Ages were not the same as the Renaissance. I know it’s all Old™ to you lot, but they were in fact very different periods of time. People who say things like that probably can’t even quantify what dates were “medieval” versus “Middle Ages”

One day I will kill anyone who says things like that on television!

Medieval is what, 800 to 1100, Middle Ages 1100-1350, Renaissance 1350-1550?

*huffs* to hear Wikipedia tell it it’s all the bloody same! Yes, you’re approximately correct.

I don’t much care for labels, but to my mind, the medieval was that time immediately following the fall of Rome and the rise of Gail. The Middle Ages encapsulated the crusades, and the Renaissance was a lovely time, except for all the plague.

I simply don’t want to listen to a psychologist who is profiling criminals to bring up “those supposed doctors in the medieval times who bled people”

Sir…bleeding was a common practice well into the 19th century. And Medieval Times is a restarting franchise.

Also Medieval Times is a perfectly lovely place to get tanked on your birthday and watch attractive fellows smack the tar out of each other. Plus! The horses! (Which I know you don’t like I’m sorry)

Pirates Dinner Adventure though? Oooooh man

We didn’t eat giant turkey legs. WE DIDN’T HAVE TURKEYS.

Mine served chicken, or “baby dragon”

Do I need to tell you we didn’t eat dragons either?

Do you know what Simon hates?

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

youcantseebutimmakingaface:

simonalkenmayer:

Watching programs in which an “expert” says anything beginning with “Well, this is like medieval times, when supposed … roamed the countryside offering …”

Out! You are not an expert. Silence!

The medieval and the Middle Ages were not the same. And the Middle Ages were not the same as the Renaissance. I know it’s all Old™ to you lot, but they were in fact very different periods of time. People who say things like that probably can’t even quantify what dates were “medieval” versus “Middle Ages”

One day I will kill anyone who says things like that on television!

Medieval is what, 800 to 1100, Middle Ages 1100-1350, Renaissance 1350-1550?

*huffs* to hear Wikipedia tell it it’s all the bloody same! Yes, you’re approximately correct.

I don’t much care for labels, but to my mind, the medieval was that time immediately following the fall of Rome and the rise of Gail. The Middle Ages encapsulated the crusades, and the Renaissance was a lovely time, except for all the plague.

I simply don’t want to listen to a psychologist who is profiling criminals to bring up “those supposed doctors in the medieval times who bled people”

Sir…bleeding was a common practice well into the 19th century. And Medieval Times is a restarting franchise.

Also Medieval Times is a perfectly lovely place to get tanked on your birthday and watch attractive fellows smack the tar out of each other. Plus! The horses! (Which I know you don’t like I’m sorry)

Pirates Dinner Adventure though? Oooooh man

We didn’t eat giant turkey legs. WE DIDN’T HAVE TURKEYS.

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